Marine Corps Body Bearers

http://www.espn.com/core/video/iframe?id=25231107&endcard=false

8th and I, Bravo Company is home to the Marine Corps Body Bearer Section. The section is comprised of 15 Marines whose primary mission is to bear the caskets at funerals for Marines, former Marines, and Marine family members at Arlington National Cemetery and the surrounding cemeteries in the National Capitol Region. On occasion, they are called to travel to locations all around the country to support funerals for senior statesmen, heads of state, and former Presidents of the United States.

The Body Bearer section is also the saluting battery at MBW, firing three 40mm cannons located at the south end of the parade deck. The saluting battery renders honors for special events and visiting dignitaries.

The road to becoming a Body Bearer is not an easy. Each member has to demonstrate that he has the bearing and physical strength to carry out this mission. A typical day for a Body Bearer includes several hours of ceremonial drill practice and intensive weight training and conditioning. The remainder of the day includes infantry knowledge and skills proficiency training.

80 year old Marine Vietnam Vet to get the Medal of Honor

John Canley led Marines through the streets fighting in the Vietnamese city of Hue more than 50 years ago. The Battle of Hue took place during the Tet Offensive, Jan. 31-Feb. 6, 1968. Canley, now 80 and a retired sergeant major, carried several wounded Marines while under heavy enemy fire and assumed command to maintain the unit’s organization and morale in what’s known as the most chaotic battle of the Vietnam War.

Canley was wounded more than once during the fighting, but still continued pushing forward.

“So they hear a noise and they look back and there’s Canley. He’s walking down, upright, not running, walks over the little berm, picks up the first guy, throws him over his shoulder and walks back,” John Ligato, a Marine and FBI agent, told Newsweek about Canley’s heroics. “So there’s two independent eyewitnesses on this. … Canley says to them, individually, ‘Keep down, there’s a lot of incoming.’”

On Tuesday, President Trump announced that Canley will be awarded the Medal of Honor on Oct. 17 for his “conspicuous gallantry.”

GySgt Daniel Price book

http://www.woodtv.com/news/ottawa-county/gold-star-mom-remembers-fallen-marine-in-book/1153998706

From future (and past) member Dan Groenendyk:

Ruth Price, mother of GySgt Daniel Price, who died in Afghanistan, July 2012, and native of Holland, MI, invited me to her house today.  I received a signed copy of her new book, NO STRAY BULLETS, the story of GySgt Price.  The book is available on Amazon.com as well as Reader’s World in Holland. 

The Shoreline Detachment’s donation of $800.00 for the family meal at the funeral is noted in the book on page 132.  There is a paragraph on our donation via a fundraising effort we did in Grand Haven at the American Legion Post serving meals. 

Go check it out and buy the book!  Dan bought the Detachment 3 copies.  They can be borrowed from our quarters at the VFW.

Cold War Medal

There has been some discussion around the Cold War Medal / Ribbon.  In 1998, Congress directed the Secretary of Defense to establish a certificate to honor United States Armed Forces members as well as eligible civilians who contributed honorably to the Cold War effort between September 2, 1945 and December 26, 1991. Those who received the Cold War Recognition Certificate may wish to accompany it with a medal and ribbon, though as an independently created award it is not eligible for wear on military uniforms.  In other words, it is good for the shadowbox, not for the uniform.  There are a number of Military Veterans retail sites that sell this medal if you wish to purchase it.

Authorization indicated in SecNav Instruction 1650.1H (see below)

http://www.marines.mil/Portals/59/Publications/SecNavInst%201650.1H.pdf